Quote Japan

Interesting, odd, outrageous or informative quotes about Japan

War- Quotes about Japanese army, Self-Defence force, battles and conflicts

“I was once even suspended from school for writing romantic fiction stories… In those days [the 1930s and 40s], junior high school students were not allowed to write love stories. After all, it was an era of militarism” Sanrio founder Shintaro Tsuji, Japan Times, 2 March 08

“The students were ordered to research parachutes… Then one day, of piece of cloth was passed to us, and we were told to examine its quality. We thought it was the best cloth we had ever tested. It was nylon, and was used in the parachutes of Americans who became our prisioners of war. At that point, we realised we were no match.” Shintaro Tsuji, founder of Sanrio, Japan Times 2 March 08

“The war situation has developed not necessarily to Japan’s advantage”- a translation of the clearest reference to surrender in the speech on Japanese radio ending WWII, quoted by George Mikes, The Land of the Rising Yen

“Japan’s isolation from World War I had kept the nation free of Europe’s war weary cynicism, and, too, of the horrors of such war” Insight Guides Japan with an explanation for the Japanese route to war I haven’t heard before

“The entire population got into the act to make those airplanes or munitions of war… men,women and children. We knew we were going to kill a lot of women and kids when we burned that town. Had to be done.”

Curtis LeMay, mastermind of the firebombing of Japanese cities, quoted in Japan Times, 17 Feb 08

“Men are supposed to be responsible for protecting newborn babies, women and aged mothers. Men in Japan, however, are utterly incapable of accomplishing this mission because they do not receive military training”

Then Prime Minister Hashimoto Ryutaro, Japan Times International, April 1999

“If Japanese hadn’t fought the white people, we would still be slaves of the white people. It would be colonization. We changed that.”- Ishihara Shintaro, Governor of Tokyo

“Japan’s isolation from World War I had kept the nation free of Europe’s war weary cynicism, and, too, of the horrors of such war” Insight Guides Japan with an explanation for the Japanese route to war I haven’t heard before

“It was the worst time in my life coming back from Korea at the end. Never be on the losing side: that’s the golden rule- that’s what that taught me” A common lesson learnt by the Japanese after WWII, as told by a veteran to Ronald P Dore

“There are no veterans’ associations to keep alive nostalgia for the war-time camaraderie, and recent nationalist revisionism has not much altered the interpretation of the war which took root in the immediate shock of defeat; it was not just a lost war, and not just a foolish war, but somehow also a guilty war” Ronald P. Dore

“We really believed we were there for China’s sake. But the Chinese weren’t grateful. And we, well, we were all expecting to die, after all. We were all trained not to expect to come back, so it didn’t matter much what you did…. You were doing it on “the other side of death”, you see” WWII veteran, quoted by Ronald P Dore

“It would be: ‘Everyone face towards the Imperial Palace! Deepest bow!’ Funny, we hardly think about the Emperor nowadays from one year’s end to another, but we did then, that’s for sure. We were always bowing to the Emperor for one thing or the other” Someone who was a school child during WWII, quoted by Ronald P. Dore

“Jealous of the fact that ‘his war’ had been won by two bombs prepared without his knowledge and dropped without his command, (General) MacArthur determined to do his best to erase from history- or at least blur as well as censorship could- the important human lessons of radiation’s effect on civil populations” George Weller, the first Western journalist into Nagasaki after the bomb

“What was the reason (for banning journalists from the site of the nuclear bomb blasts)? To keep the victory of two nuclear weapons from eclipsing a general? To prevent it being said that the Pacific War was finally won in the Manhattan Project, not in Manila?” George Weller

“The war situation has developed not necessarily to Japan’s advantage”- a translation of the clearest reference to surrender in the speech on Japanese radio ending WWII, quoted by George Mikes

“American prisioners working in the Mitsubishi plant were naturally told that if defeated, the entire nation would commit hara-kiri. But the executives of the plant had taught their foremen some highly unsuicidal terms, such as, “How are you today?” and “We workers want to save our plant.”” George Weller in First into Nagasaki pg 17

 “The atomic bomb may be classified as a weapon capable of being used indiscriminately, but its use in Nagasaki was selective and proper and as merciful as such a gigantic force could be expected to be” George Weller in First into Nagasaki pg 29

“In the last war you Americans confined Germans in Japan; this war we Germans are going to take you Americans to Japan and see how you like a taste of the same medicine”A WWII German airman, quoted by George Weller in First into Nagasaki  pg 33

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